What to expect from a RAS home support assessment?

Once you are booked in for your RAS home support assessment, our qualified assessor will come to your home and carry out a holistic assessment. Our assessor will be asking lots of questions to get to know you, and we can help you prepare for them.

In this video we cover:

  1. I have been booked in for my RAS assessment, what can I expect now?

    Once you are booked in for your assessment, our qualified assessor will come to your home and carry out a holistic assessment. Our assessor will be asking lots of questions to get to know you. The assessor will be interested in what you do day-to-day, what you enjoy doing and the areas of your life you find challenging.

  2. What do I need to prepare prior to the assessment?

    The assessor will need to confirm your identity. For this, they will require you to provide some identification which may include your pension card, driver's license, photo ID card or Medicare card.

    If there is anything that the assessor will need to know to access your property or may impact the assessment please let your assessment service know – for instance, if you have a large dog, a security gate or have recently been sick with the flu.

    Your assessor will discuss any current medication you are taking so please have this readily available.

  3. What happens during an assessment?

    Our assessor will discuss your situation and how you currently maintain your independence and what supports you have available to you.

    Next, you and your assessor will create an individual support plan which will include any concerns you have and set goals for your future.

    Finally, your assessor will refer you to any relevant groups or organisations in your community that are best suited to help you achieve your goals.

  4. How long does the assessment take?

    Most assessments run for around 90 minutes, however, we would recommend allowing for up to two hours.

  5. Do I need to have a family member present for the assessment?

    You don’t need to have a family member present for the assessment, however, in some instances a family member or someone you trust may be able to assist you with the process. For example, if you have identified a decline in your memory or you are finding it difficult to complete tasks like your banking or attending medical appointments and would usually rely on someone else to assist you.